PMS

The Ultimate Guide to Relieving Menstrual Cramps

Let’s fight cramps!

Cramps happen when your muscles work super hard to push out your period. Your uterus has a layer of muscle and together with the muscles in your lower tummy area, they contract during your period to push your period out from the uterus and exiting from the vagina.

When you sneeze and you feel a bit of period shoot out down there, that’s the exact same thing! When you sneeze, it makes your muscles in your lower tummy area tighten up and contract, pushing out your period!

Period cramps are usually felt in one or more of these areas:

• A cramp at the lower part of your tummy
• A backache usually at the lower back area
• An ache along the inner thigh area

Cramps hurt but they don’t have to with our ultimate tips for cramp relief.

What are the best ways to fight cramps?
hot water bottle
1. Apply heat to the cramp

You can use a hot water bottle or an electric heating pad. Hold it against your cramp for as long you need. If you’re using a hot water bottle, it may get cold before your cramp goes away and that’s ok. Just refill your bottle with more hot water.

Why it works

Applying heat directly to the cramp will relax your sore muscles. It also increases blood flow to your sore muscles, providing you with sweet relief and comfort!

 
 
handtummy
2. Rub your tummy with your hand

We’re not always at home where we can fill up our hot water bottle. But don’t worry, not all hope is lost! Rubbing your tummy with your hand can produce enough heat to soothe a mild cramp.

Why it works

This works in the same way as applying heat to the cramp. It relaxes your sore muscles and increases blood flow providing relief and comfort.

 
 
hot tea
3. Enjoy a hot beverage

A nice hot tea or hot yummy soup can warm up your tummy and soothe your tummy cramps!

Many girls find that the opposite is also true. Ice cold drinks can make cramps worse so you may want to skip the ice!

Why it works

This works in the same way as applying heat to the cramp but instead we’re doing this from the inside!

 
 
ibuprofen
4. Take ibuprofin

Ibuprofin, also commonly known as Advil, acts as a painkiller. Although it is available over the counter, it is also a drug so please consult your doctor before taking it.

Why it works

Ibuprofin works by suppressing the effect of prostaglandins secreted by your body. Prostaglandin causes your uterus to contract which can cause menstrual cramps.

 
 
letter o
5. Have an orgasm!

You can achieve an orgasm through masturbation or sex. Yes, you can even do it during your period!

Why it works

Orgasms give you rush of endorphins, a neurotransmitter that can inhibit pain. Orgasms also increase blood flow to your lower tummy and genital area providing relief and comfort.

 
 
Exercise during your period
6. Exercise!

You may not feel like getting up and moving but exercising will actually help reduce pain from menstrual cramps! When you get a good work out, your body releases a neurotransmitter called endorphins that act as a natural pain killer.

Why it works

Endorphins fight pain by inhibiting pain and reducing our perception of pain so your menstrual cramps feel more manageable.

 
 
nuts and seeds
7. Eat food rich in Magnesium

Eat foods such as dark leafy greens, nuts and seeds, fish, beans and lentils, whole grains, avocados, bananas, and dark chocolate.

Why it works

Magnesium is an essential mineral that acts as a muscle relaxant. It soothes aching cramping muscles and lower back pain. It can even lower prostaglandins which may cause your muscles to over contract causing painful menstrual cramps.

 
 
bananas
8. Get enough Potassium in your diet

Eat foods such as dark leafy greens, yogourt, fish, bananas, avocados, white mushrooms, and baked potatoes.

Why it works

Potassium is another essential mineral that allows your muscles to function properly, including your uterine muscles that may cramp up during your period. Too little potassium and your muscles may cramp painfully when they don’t need to.

Have you tried any of these tips?

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PMS Symptoms

Let’s learn about our periods!

PMS symptoms are experienced 1-14 days before your period and may also persist into your period.

A majority of girls experience few or mild PMS symptoms. But different girls experience a different set of symptoms. So it’s totally normal if you don’t experience the same set of symptoms as your sister or friend.

The reason PMS symptoms vary and differ from girl to girl is that our bodies respond differently to the hormones that drive our menstrual cycle and the individual lifestyle choices we make.

Most girls will experience at least one symptom of PMS and it is usually not severe enough to interfere with your daily activities. So don’t worry! You can still do everything you usually do!

PMS Symptoms
Menstrual Cramps
Also known as period cramps, you will usually feel them in your lower tummy area, lower back, or along your inner thighs.
 
Breasts feel tender
Your breasts feel a little bigger, feel swollen, and may hurt when you touch or squeeze them.
 
Headaches
Hormonal changes during your period can cause headaches.
 
Acne
Hormonal changes during your period can cause your skin to break out.
 
Changes in Appetite
You may feel like you’re eating more than usual or you may feel that you’ve lost your appetite. Remember it is important to eat, especially during your period.
 
Cravings
It’s completely normal to crave all your favorite foods. A popular favorite among women are chocolate and sweets!
 
Constipation & Diarrhea
Not often talked about but this is a very common PMS symptom.
 
Feeling Bloated
Your tummy or abdominal area may feel full or bigger than usual.
Feeling Moody
One minute you may feel super happy and the next minute you may feel sad. Mood swings are common PMS symptom.
 
Feeling Irritable
You may find a lot of things irritate you more than usual.
 
Feeling Tired
Even though it doesn’t feel like you’re doing a lot of work, your body is spending a lot of energy to prepare for your period so it’s normal to feel a little tired.
 
Treatment & Management
If PMS is bothering you, you can make some lifestyle changes to treat mild to moderate PMS. This includes:

  • Getting regular exercise
  • Quitting smoking
  • Reducing intake of alcohol
  • Staying hydrated
  • Getting a good night’s sleep
  • Managing your stress

If you experience severe PMS symptoms or that it interferes with your daily activities, then please see your doctor.

For relieving menstrual cramps, please see The Ultimate Guide To Relieving Menstrual Cramps

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Premenstrual Syndrome aka PMS

Let’s learn about our periods!

Premenstrual syndrome, also known as PMS, is the name given to a set symptoms experienced 1-14 days before your period begins and may also persist into your period. PMS is completely normal and is just another part of getting your period.

Learn & Explore
pms

A majority of girls experience few or mild PMS symptoms. But different girls experience a different set of symptoms.
 
The reason PMS symptoms vary and differ from girl to girl is that our bodies respond differently to the hormones that drive our menstrual cycle and the individual lifestyle choices we make.

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Cramps happen when your muscles work super hard to push out your period. Your uterus has a layer of muscle and together with the muscles in your lower tummy area, they contract during your period to push your period out from the uterus and exiting from the vagina.

Cramps may hurt but they don’t have to when you follow our ultimate tips for cramp relief!

 
 

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